License #: TACLA48636E, TACLB005273
Faq

F.A.Q.’s

  1. Why is it important for an air conditioner to dehumidify?
  2. I occasionally see black particles blowing out of my unit. What are these and do I need to do anything about it?
  3. Why is there water in the base pan of my air conditioner?
  4. I’m renovating and don’t want to run ductwork. What cooling options do I have?
  5. What causes ice to build up in an air conditioner?
  6. Water is draining into my room from my air conditioner. What do I do?
  7. How often should air conditioner filters be cleaned or replaced?
  8. Should I repair or replace my current system?
  9. What do SEER rating numbers mean?
  10. Should a thermostat be set to auto or on?
  11. Can shrubs and flowers be planted around an outdoor unit?
  12. How do you know what size system a house needs?

Why is it important for an air conditioner to dehumidify?

Air conditioners keep you comfortable by removing heat and moisture from the air. To do both effectively, the unit must be properly sized for your space. If the capacity is too low, you may never feel quite cool enough. When the capacity is too high, the unit produces so much cold air so quickly that the room reaches the desired temperature before the unit has adequate run time to dehumidify. The result is a cool but clammy room that can feel just as uncomfortable as one that is not cool enough.

I occasionally see black particles blowing out of my unit. What are these and do I need to do anything about it?

If your unit is only a couple of years old, then what you are seeing is probably due to a maintenance issue. Air conditioners remove both heat and humidity from a room. That humidity condenses on the air conditioner coils and drains into the base pan where it is used to cool the unit. Occasionally, mold or mildew will take advantage of this high moisture environment. The only way to alleviate this situation is to have the unit professionally cleaned. Any of our authorized service company can treat the problem, however, you may use any servicer that you prefer since this is not a warranty issue.

Why is there water in the base pan of my air conditioner?

Air conditioners remove both heat and humidity from a room. This process produces condensation which runs off into the base pan. This condensation is then used to cool the hot condenser coil which improves the unit’s performance.

I’m renovating and don’t want to run ductwork. What cooling options do I have?

That depends on how many rooms need to be conditioned. For a single-room addition with exterior walls and windows, a window or thru-the-wall installation is a good choice. For multi-room additions, or if you don’t have windows or exterior walls, consider a ductless split system. Like a central air conditioner, ductless split systems are two-piece systems with one part outdoors and one (or multiple) indoor units that distribute the conditioned air. Indoor units typically mount high on a wall or, occasionally, in the ceiling or on the floor. Multi-zone ductless systems can condition up to four spaces with one outdoor condensing unit.

What causes ice to build up in an air conditioner?

Icing can be caused by a number of factors. Units that have not been cleaned over a long period of time may have coils and fins clogged by dust, dirt or debris. Clogged coils and fins restrict air flow through the unit, which can cause the compressor to work even harder – so hard, that it may reduce the coil temperature below the normal range in an attempt to make up for the lost cooling power from the blocked coils.

Another potential cause is running a unit with a very cold set point (i.e. turning the target temperature down very low) on low fan speed for an extended period of time. This can cause excess condensate to build up on the coils, further lowering the temperature of the coil and leading to icing.

It may be helpful to ask an authorized warranty service provider to check the unit for you.

Water is draining into my room from my air conditioner. What do I do?

This problem generally has one of two causes: the unit was not installed properly with the outside lower than the inside to allow for adequate exterior drainage, or there may be a clog in the drain pan where condensate collects during operation.

If you feel that neither of these conditions exists, check for air leaking in from the outside anywhere around the unit. Air leaks will cause condensation to form on the outside of the unit, and this water will drain into your room. If there are any air leaks, resealing them should address the problem.

How often should air conditioner filters be cleaned or replaced?

Typically, filters should be replaced or cleaned once every three to six months depending on how many pets and people are in the building. Some units are equipped with permanent filters. These can be cleaned according to the instructions supplied by Conditioned Air.  Disposal filters should be replaced with filters of like type and size as the original filter.

Should I repair or replace my current system?

Although high quality air conditioning systems can last 8-10 years or more, our climate puts a heavy burden on your system. Here are some red flags that suggest that replacing your system may be the smartest solution:

  • Your system is 10 years old or more.
  • You are having to invest in too many expensive repairs once you are out of warranty.
  • Your AC system just can’t keep up with the heat and fails to keep you cool and dry.
  • You are getting a number of new hot or cold spots.
  • You are hearing strange vibrations or other inexplicable noise problems.
  • Your electric bill is climbing because your old system is so inefficient.

What do SEER rating numbers mean?

To help consumers make informed choices, the U.S. government requires an efficiency rating of all air conditioning and heating equipment. The rating is meant to reflect the percentage of energy used efficiently. A high rating indicates high efficiency. There are various names for the efficiency ratings of varying types of equipment. Air conditioning equipment is rated by the Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating, or SEER. Heat pump equipment is rated by the Heating Seasonal Performance Factor, or HSPF. Gas furnaces are rated according to their Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency, or AFUE.

Should a thermostat be set to auto or on?

When the thermostat is set to auto, the fan operates only when the temperature requires it. This is the most used setting. However, there are advantages to using the on setting. First of all, the air in the house is constantly filtered through the units air filter. Secondly, the constantly circulating air results in an even temperature throughout the house. However, the “on” position will result in higher humidity since air is being blown over wet coils after the condenser shuts off.

Can shrubs and flowers be planted around an outdoor unit?

Yes. However, we recommend that plants be no closer than 18 inches from the unit. This allows plenty of room for air circulation in and out of the unit. Without this room for air circulation, the unit could overheat, resulting in a premature need for service.

How do you know what size system a house needs?

There are many variables to be considered before determining which system is best for you, such as size of the house, climate at the location, the number and type of windows, insulation of the house, number of people in the house, etc. Conditioned Air will consider all the factors in making a recommendation.  The most accurate way is to perform a Manual J Heat Load calculation. We have the ability to perform these heat and cooling loads and energy calculations for any home

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